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Prepare to be overwhelmed in a completely positive and helpful way by a trainer-learner’s Valentine's Day gift.
As Char Booth (Ohio University Libraries) notes in her infomational blog this week, Jane Hart at the online Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies has posted a work-in-progress: a Spring 2008 Top 100 Tools for Learning list; the 101st tool, of course, is the list itself. If you haven’t yet bookmarked it by adding it to your del.icio.us account (del.icio.us being the top-rated tool on the list today), the only question to be asked is, “What are you waiting for?” And if you want to influence it, you can, before April 1, 2008, submit your own contribution to the rankings.
The real value of the site for those struggling to keep up with first-rate training-learning tools—many of them are Web 2.0 applications—is that it is organized in an easy-to-read and easy-to-use format. The list provides the name of the tool; its rankings in 2007 and 2008; the number of votes it has received so far to place it on the list; and links which usually provide two- or three-line descriptions of each tool, users’ comments about the tools, and, at the bottom of those pages, online resources including reading lists and resources such as online tutorials.
What we have here is a crash course, in small and digestible units, on tools including del.icio.us, Firefox, Google Search, Google Reader, Skype, PowerPoint, WordPress, Wikipedia, Slideshare, Google Docs, and 90 other tools. (Audacity, Gmail, Twitter, flickr, Ning, and YouTube are right behind the top ten items on the current list.)
At the most simple level, trainers will find the list to be a great starting point if they are trying to design workshops for staff interested in Web 2.0 tools; simply moving through the list provides a content outline for a Web 2.0 update session. The list itself can be used as a handout for that sort of session, and it can also be distributed to staff via email, on a library intranet training page, or as an additional bookmark on a reference desk computer work station so that staff can look up and provide brief descriptions of any of these tools which a library user wants to explore.
And if you somehow work your way through the entire list and still want more, you can always create a link from your Netvibes page (Netvibes being #38 on the Top 100 list today) to Hart’s E-Learning Pick of the Day blog.
The list and the Centre’s site are training-learning at its best: accessible when you need them, easy to use, easy to print if you want ready-made cheat sheets, and free. So, what are you waiting for?

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Comments

Comment: 
Have you ever tried Pageflakes? I think for those just getting into Web 2.0, Pageflakes is much easier to use than Netvibes. In fact Pageflakes even has a teacher edition so teachers and their students can have an easy to use webpage for discussions and coursework. www.teachers.pageflakes.com

Comment: 
I've only played with PageFlakes a little bit, and agree with you that it's a wonderful tool. The main reason I mentioned (and chose) Netvibes over PageFlakes is that I found it before seeing PageFlakes and have been extremely satisfied with Netvibes. Would love to hear from others who have tried either/both.

Comment: 
I've only played with PageFlakes a little bit, and agree with you that it's a wonderful tool. The main reason I mentioned (and chose) Netvibes over PageFlakes is that I found it before seeing PageFlakes and have been extremely satisfied Netvibes. Would love to hear from others who have tried either/both.

Comment: 
Jane's E-Learning Pick of the Day - brief daily profiles of online learning tools - is, as you noted, another useful aspect of the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies site. It's well worth using (at http://janeknight.typepad.com/pick/).