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annelipow.jpgAnne Lipow, renowned library trainer and consultant, died yesterday, September 9, around 10:30 PM, after a long battle with cancer. Anne was the founder and director of Library Solutions Institute and Press. She was the author of numerous books and articles, including "Crossing the Internet Threshold" and "The Virtual Reference Librarian's Handbook." Her "Rethinking Reference" institutes were recognized as being internationally significant and contributed to Anne's receipt of the ALA Isadore Gilbert Mudge/R.R. Bowker award for "a distinguished contribution to reference librarianship."
Anne was very special to Infopeople because she was the guiding force in the initial development of the Infopeople training program, and she was responsible for bringing Cheryl Gould to Infopeople. Over the years, she was always there for us, giving us new ideas, advice, and inspiration. The courage and style with which she faced the challenge of her illness was truly amazing. Anne will be greatly missed by all of us and by the greater library community.
If you have some personal comments or remembrances you'd like to share, please click on the "comments" link below. We will be sharing these comments with Anne's family.

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Annes friends at Berkeleys Library have stories of her restless energy and good deeds that go back decades. I knew her first as a Hall of Fame figure, making the great plays which always, in the retelling, went as follows: Then. . . Anne set things right! In my time as University Librarian I have appreciated her warmth and savvy. Anne was one step ahead of others in our final conversations. Sitting on the sunny deck at home, she introduced me to two Tiburon librarians, reflected on the memorial service for Reggie Zelnik, worried over the Kerry campaign, considered ingenious ways to link up with old colleagues, and raved about the grave site that she had just helped Steve to select. She had counted the bridges one might see from where she was to rest. Carol and I send our love. Tom Leonard

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I was planning on visiting with Anne on November 3 and sharing the excitement of a better government being elected. We will all miss her but remember all the good she brought to the world.

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Anne was one of the best library trainers I have ever met. She was warm, welcoming, charming and funny. She not only knew a heck of a lot about reference and people, she knew how to bring the two together in productive, forward looking ways. I only met her a few times at trainings and conferences but she made me feel like a friend. I will miss her.

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It was a real pleasure reconnecting with Anne after not seeing her for so many years. As a SLATE stalwart and gourmet cook she was an inspiration and hostess for our SLATE arcieves project fundraiser. I know that I shall miss her.

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Following is the message I sent to Steve Silberstein, Anne's husband, Friday, September 10th. --- Steve, I was at a loss for words when you called this AM, and also didn't want to hold you up while you were making all of those phone calls. But not now... The physical plant that was Anne Grodzins Lipow may have died, but the strength, the energy, the enthusiasm, the love she had for her family and friends, her intellectual curiosity, her political and professional passions, her unstinting generosity and loyalty, are all things that did not and will not die. Anne's example and these precious attributes--that only partly describe the extraordinary person she was--are alive and well in you, her family, and everyone else who had the privilege and joy to know and experience her love, caring, attention, enthusiasms, and all the rest of what made her unique, so very special, and so loved. She also was an incredible role model for all of us--her commitment to principle, to serving the user, to helping and mentoring her colleagues, and to the future of libraries and information, are great guides for continuing and new librarians; and when all of these became coupled "after retirement" with her business acumen, her achievement was unprecedented. On behalf of Paula and me, I extend my most sincere and loving condolences to you and to Anne's children and grandchild. Please let me know if there's anything I can do that will be of help. Also, please let me know where I can make a donation to any cause(s) she or you may have chosen. Your friend, mitch

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Thanks to Anne for her lifetime of good work, including the wonderful brunch that she cooked for us old SLATEniks to benefit the archives and to give us a good opportunity to get together and schmooze with Jo Freeman. It was a wonderful day.

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I had known Anne since 1972 when she and Dick Dougherty invented BAKER, and I had the greatest respect for her skills and knowledge. I had heard only scraps about her illness and had no idea it was terminal. A shame. The word to best describe her is "astute," in the fullest and most admiring sense of that term. She will never never be replaced, and the library world has lost one of its truly top guns, especially in the aspect of fighting for the oft-ignored perspective of user needs.

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Re-posted from Roy's Web4Lib discussion group at http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Web4Lib/archive/0409/0101.html [WEB4LIB] For Anne Roy Tennant (roy.tennant@ucop.edu) Sat, 11 Sep 2004 17:17:02 -0700 (PDT) Anne Grodzins Lipow -- a true treasure of librarianship -- died at her home in Belvedere, CA on Thursday, September 9 of cancer. There is so much to say about Anne, that I despair of describing how she has affected us -- not just those blessed with knowing her personally, but also the library profession as a whole. I do not know Anne's life history, nor her many contributions outside of librarianship, so from me you will get a very personal story, and perhaps through this one small window get to know something about this remarkable person, and why I am posting such a personal message to this list. As a newly-minted librarian at UC Berkeley in the second half of the 1980s, I knew Anne as the person who led the outreach and instructional efforts of the library. Before long, she saw in me the potential to be a good teacher, despite my fear of public speaking, so she pulled me into her program and began teaching me everything she knew about speaking, putting on workshops, making handouts, etc. Under her tutelage, I taught such classes as dialup access to the library catalog, when 300bps modems were still common. As the Internet began making inroads into universities, Anne was there with newly-developed workshops on how to use it. She was convinced very early on, as was I, that the Internet would be an essential technology for libraries. This led to her approaching me and my colleague John Ober (then on faculty at the library school at Berkeley) about doing a full-day Internet workshop scheduled to coincide with the 1992 ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco. Using a metaphor of John's, we called it "Crossing the Internet Threshold". In preparing for the workshop, we created so many handouts that we needed to put them into a binder that began to look increasingly like a book in the making. With typical Anne flair, she arranged for the gifted librarian cartoonist Gary Handman (also our colleague at Berkeley) to create a snazzy cover for the binder, that she also used to create T-shirts (which many of us have to this day). Anne knew enough about workshops to do a "trial run" before the big day, so we used UCB library staff as guinea pigs a couple weeks before, which gave us feedback essential to making an excellent workshop. In the end, the workshop was such a hit that Anne ran with it. She took the binder of handouts we had created and made a book out of it -- the first book of her newly-created business called Library Solutions Institute and Press. Her decision to publish the book herself rather than seek out a publisher was also typical of Anne. And _how_ she did it will tell you a lot about her. Despite the higher cost, Anne insisted on using domestic union printing shops for printing. While other publishers were publishing books overseas for a fraction of the cost, to Anne publishing was a political and social activity, through which she could do good for those around her. It was very important to her to treat people with respect and kindness, and she did it so well. That was the kind of person Anne was. While every publisher I have so far worked with other than Anne has insisted they are incapable of paying royalties any more frequently than twice a year, Anne paid her authors _monthly_. And whereas other publishers wait _months_ to pay you for royalties earned long before, Anne would pay immediately. This meant that when books were returned, as they sometimes were, she took the loss for having paid the author royalties on books that had not been sold. That was the kind of person Anne was. Anne continued to blaze new trails after libraries began climbing on the Internet bandwagon, due in no small measure to her books and workshops on the topic. Anne became a well-known and coveted consultant on a number of topics, but in particular on reference services. Her "Rethinking Reference" institutes and book were widely acclaimed, and her book "The Virtual Reference Librarian's Handbook" (just published in 2003) demonstrated that Anne was always at the cutting edge of librarianship. That was the kind of person Anne was. I visited her after her cancer was diagnosed and after her treatment had failed. We all knew there was no hope, that she had only a matter of weeks to live. Despite the obvious ravages of the illness, Anne's outlook remained bright and welcoming. She was happy to have her friends and family around her, and we talked of many things except that which hung over us all. Even then, she was happy to see whoever came by, and to talk with them with a smile and good wishes. That was the kind of person Anne was. A piece of all my major professional accomplishments I owe to Anne, and her great and good influence on me. She would deny this, despite it's truth, wanting all the credit to accrue to me alone. That was the kind of person Anne was. That, and so much more. Goodbye, good friend. We are so much the poorer for your passing. Roy

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I am so glad that Anne came into my life and in the process helped me to be a much better librarian and library director. When she started working with Holly (Hinman professionally...my wife personally) when they were beginning to establish Infopeople as a training organization, I had many wonderful discussions with Anne that truly changed my professional and personal beliefs. Her positive attitude about looking at change in libraries and how librarians perform their craft led me and my staff to new realizations that were central to building the Cerritos Library. She began to work with my staff in 1996 to bring about understanding of what would be needed in the public library of the 21st century and to facilitate the change process necessary for developing a new library culture. She played a key role in shaping the new library by saying things like..."great idea, wrong approach," "what about this," "you're crazy," and of course..."let me help you with that idea." Anne came down for opening day of the new Library, March 16, 2002. I was extremely happy to see her and get her honest reactions to what we have done in creating a new type of library. Her eyes were sparking and she was truely moved by the experience...thank god, because she would have said so if we had not achieved our goals. Anne's initial inspriration helped us to develop our approaches to many revolutionary service concepts and building ideas -- she gave us a great start that provided a foundation for Joan Frye Williams, our primary consultant, to build on. Her warm and engaging manner made all of us feel receptive to the adventure ahead. On a personal note, I loved the colorful sixties clothing that she wore during the first training sessions sessions she did for Infopeople. The last time I saw her, in San Diego for ALA (when she wanted more copies of our DVD to share with people), we talked about having lunch, but we never got around to it... I wish that we could have had that lunch. I remember so well the early days when Anne, Roy and John were doing Internet workshops and introducing this interesting new tool, "Gopher." We had silly conversations about the move from Berkeley to the new house. We could talk for hours about living in Berkeley...I was there in 1965 ... I had a blast as a kid learning new ideas and having experiences. Anyway, Anne is a very special person who lives in my heart and soul...I will miss her and yet can sense her presence right now. My sympathy to Steve and family. Peace

Comment: 
Although we all knew that this sad news was supposed to come soon,it has struck me,like all of us,like a blow.We have not shared any professional interest,we were friends in the best sense of the word.I never had a sister but she felt like one.I will always treasure our friendship as very special and in my thoughts I am with her husband and family. With love and peace for Anne,her husband and children

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