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annelipow.jpgAnne Lipow, renowned library trainer and consultant, died yesterday, September 9, around 10:30 PM, after a long battle with cancer. Anne was the founder and director of Library Solutions Institute and Press. She was the author of numerous books and articles, including "Crossing the Internet Threshold" and "The Virtual Reference Librarian's Handbook." Her "Rethinking Reference" institutes were recognized as being internationally significant and contributed to Anne's receipt of the ALA Isadore Gilbert Mudge/R.R. Bowker award for "a distinguished contribution to reference librarianship."
Anne was very special to Infopeople because she was the guiding force in the initial development of the Infopeople training program, and she was responsible for bringing Cheryl Gould to Infopeople. Over the years, she was always there for us, giving us new ideas, advice, and inspiration. The courage and style with which she faced the challenge of her illness was truly amazing. Anne will be greatly missed by all of us and by the greater library community.
If you have some personal comments or remembrances you'd like to share, please click on the "comments" link below. We will be sharing these comments with Anne's family.

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Comment: 
www.library-solutions.com has link to sfgate.com death notice/obit. In response to many requests, personal email can be directed to Anne's husband Steve Silberstein at stevesilberstein@hotmail.com and daughter Stephanie Lipow at slipow@alamedanet.net. We have planned a beautiful service for the funeral/burial today beginning at 1 at Chapel of the Chimes in Oakland; Rabbi Michael Lerner will be officiating. There will be an open house from 5 to 8 p.m. following the service at Anne's longtime Berkeley house, 2135 Oregon Street between Shattuck and Fulton (1/2 block east of berkeley bowl)--and no, there is no thing as too much food nor are any ingredients verboten.;-) Jenny Lipow

Comment: 
Dear Steve, I was very sad to learn about Anne.She was so bright , warmhearted and modest. Her skill and wisdom were manifested so well in how she approached composing our library's newsletter and how helpful she was to those of us who were trying to contribute to it. My heart and thoughts are with you. Lois Epstein

Comment: 
Our world, our profession has lost one of the best. Anne's warmth and kindness were something you simply had to experience to believe. Having the chance to spend time with her and Steve at their home are fond memories for me and my wife. I'll always remember taking a walk around the area in which they lived, with both Anne and Steve providing insight and understanding of the place and people in a way that was uniquely their own. When you were with Anne you felt embraced. I hope in some small way, through these postings, we can provide the same to Steve and each other as we share this loss.

Comment: 
With Anne's passing, the library community has lost one of its visionaries. Having attended many of Anne's workshops and presentations, and having had the pleasure of speaking with her in programs at ALA and other conferences, I learned a lot about reference service from her. Our friendly debates about the future of reference service helped me focus my own thoughts on that topic. I will always remember her warm smile and engaging personality, even as we disagreed on what reference would become. Thank you Anne for the inspiration and encouragement that you gave me over the years.

Comment: 
Among Anne's many accomplishments was her work in the early 1970s on improving the status of library workers in a traditionally women's profession - note her "A report on the status of women employed in the library of the University of California, Berkeley, with recommendations for affirmative action" , University of California, Berkeley. Library. Affirmative Action Program for Women Committee, MAIN: HD6096.B4 .C3 As the Berkeley campus bargaining representative during last year's Librarian contract negotiations, I was quite aware that our incremental progress in compensation and status was built on the hard work and spirit of those before us. Anne was one of them, and will be missed. Lincoln Cushing Bancroft Library

Comment: 
What a Life! I choose to celebrate the spirit that was Anne Lipow, rather than to mourn our tremendous loss. For many years, I was Anne's banker. I watched her grow from a table top business on Oregon Street subsidized by Dreidel sales on Telegraph Avenue to a world traveler who was in demand for her time and her thoughts. Anne was truly successful and on many levels. Two things will always stick with me however. Anne did not pretend to be someone, she was herself - always. By this I mean, Anne didn't hesitate to offer her opinion of my thoughts and my abilities, she quickly put me in my place whenever I got out of line, such as questioning the financial feasibility of selling dreidels on Telegraph, but she always did so with a quip and a smile and she always made me feel happy and close to her. The second thing I will always remember is Family and how important it was to Anne. 99% of my time with Anne was without Steve, or Stephanie or Jenny present, but you would'nt know it from our conversations. Whenever we talked, the conversation would eventually turn to family, it was easy to see, a sparkle would enter Anne's eyes, her voice tones would change from business to adoration, and she became the happiest person on Earth while talking about her daughters and her husband. Steve, Stephanie and Jenny, you are truly blessed to have been so loved in your life.

Comment: 
I had the good fortune of co-editing a book with Anne for ALA. Throughout that project, which was dauntiing and tedious at times, she remained determined to do the very best and produce something with lasting value for the profession. That's the way she worked...throughout her career. From that point on, she remained a very dear friend. We have all lost someone special.

Comment: 
Anne's enthusiasm for librarianship and providing good customer service were infectious. After a few brief moments of conversation in the lobby of a conference hotel or in her booth at library conferences, I walked away feeling somehow better for each encounter. Our profession has lost one of the truly great ones.

Comment: 
Anne was always so positive and upbeat and provided us with many memorable moments over the years as she talked us through and tried to instill in us all the qualities that she thought we needed on the frontlines of public service. Primary Clientle was her baby and we have many memories and stories from the classes she taught, and we will miss her greatly.

Comment: 
I knew Anne through her involvement in the development of UC's digital library. Anne was a driving force on committees charged with giving the early MELVYL system a face and a personality. Even when she wasn't on a committee, we heard from her anyway! She was a most supportive and encouraging Mom when I had my twins and quickly became overwhelmed with the changed world around me. I will miss her!

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