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annelipow.jpgAnne Lipow, renowned library trainer and consultant, died yesterday, September 9, around 10:30 PM, after a long battle with cancer. Anne was the founder and director of Library Solutions Institute and Press. She was the author of numerous books and articles, including "Crossing the Internet Threshold" and "The Virtual Reference Librarian's Handbook." Her "Rethinking Reference" institutes were recognized as being internationally significant and contributed to Anne's receipt of the ALA Isadore Gilbert Mudge/R.R. Bowker award for "a distinguished contribution to reference librarianship."
Anne was very special to Infopeople because she was the guiding force in the initial development of the Infopeople training program, and she was responsible for bringing Cheryl Gould to Infopeople. Over the years, she was always there for us, giving us new ideas, advice, and inspiration. The courage and style with which she faced the challenge of her illness was truly amazing. Anne will be greatly missed by all of us and by the greater library community.
If you have some personal comments or remembrances you'd like to share, please click on the "comments" link below. We will be sharing these comments with Anne's family.

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Comment: 
I was fortunate to have met Anne when she enthusiastically (a redundant adverb to use to describe her efforts!) worked with Steve Coffman on presenting new live online reference software to San Francisco Bay Area libraries in the late 90's. How could our libraries fail to buy into this revolutionary product/service with Anne so actively promoting it?! Since that time her presence at library workshops and conferences always added a special spark. One remark she made at a VRD Conference has been quoted several times and remains in the front of my mind. During a discussion about "remote" patrons (those not physically in the library building), she asked: "Who is remote, the patron or the librarian?" Yes, Anne had a wonderful way of challenging some of our traditional ways of thinking. Thank all of you for providing and contributing to this wonderful tribute to the wonderful individual who was Anne. All of our lives - and the library profession - would clearly have been lesser without her vibrant presence.

Comment: 
For me IFLA 2004, last August, was not complete - it was my first World Library and Information Congress without Anne. How we all hoped she would be present next year. Many Dutch librarians know Anne as that marvellous, energetic, beautiful and inspiring lady (was she really over sixty???) who told us about the importance of virtual reference. She will be dearly missed, also in this part of the world,

Comment: 
I was saddened to hear the news about Anne. I wish the very best for her family. She was a great visionary for our field and we'll miss her contining to prod us to think about where we should be going next. I will also miss getting to visit with her at ALA, since we always used to meet there at the exhibits and exchange info on what we were doing. Sharmon

Comment: 
In 1983 (if memory serves) I had the pleasure of having Anne as a houseguest during an Arizona Library Association meeting. She was a truly singular person -- a gifted teacher, a broad and deep thinker about library service and one of the most curious and interesting people I ever met. I was the proud recipient of one of her dreidels and cookbook stands (long since worn out!). She gave all of us so much and has an enduring legacy. She will be profoundly missed.

Comment: 
Another great thing about Anne was her sense of humor which could alternately be self-deprecatory, gentle, or just wickedly funny, but never mean. We worked together on AACR2 training, and given the rather dry subject matter her humor and warmth were particularly welcome. We once debated how many angels could dance on the pointy head of a rule interpretation. Even just thinking of her always brought a smile to my face,and I'm sure it always will. Does anyone know a good gender neutral term for "mensch?"

Comment: 
We celebrate Anne for being a mentor, a visionary, and a passionate teacher. She will be sorely missed by her many friends and colleagues. I still can't believe the news.

Comment: 
By the time I started my career here in the Berkeley Library, Anne had already moved on to other things. Many have written of her enduring impact on service, outreach and instruction and her efforts to improve the work life of librarians. One small piece of evidence of her lasting impact on the library is the fact that her handwriting in the Doe Library training room (which she established) remained on the white board for some ten years after her departure! I will miss running into Anne at conferences and at the Andronico's deli counter.

Comment: 
I am among the professional colleagues deeply affected and positively influenced by Anne. I often think of her when I need to be bold. I just now returned from the beautiful service held for Anne on this warm sunny September day. I want to thank Anne's family and friends for giving us the opportunity to be together and to share our sorrow at the passing of, but also to rejoice in, her righteous and influential life. To those of you who missed the service I can report that many of your sentiments were echoed in a series of beautiful stories and tributes. I came away feeling more strongly than ever before that for Anne it will be true that she lives on through the people she touched and the love she engendered.

Comment: 
Anne made several visits to Australia, and I was one of the lucky ones who was befriended, inspired, swept up, provoked (when needed), encouraged and generally amazed by her. It is hard to believe that Anne is no longer here with us somewhere training, writing, cycling, walking, talking, eating, or fighting the good fight. She was so active, busy and insightful, and was also one of the most generous spirits I have ever encountered. My sense of loss is very great, but then so is the sense of the great fortune and privilege of spending even the shortest time with such a wonderful person. Farewell Anne. You are truly a legend (old joke between us)

Comment: 
When I was in Library School at Berkeley, I was lucky enough to hear Anne speak about the differences in how people use a card catalog and an online catalog. Now, 15 years later, I don't remember very much from Library School but I clearly remember her comments. They have informed every decision I've made since about the way people use libraries. She was a remarkable thinker, and her death is a great loss to our profession.

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