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Are YOU reading on the level?

A friend of mine, a librarian and lifelong reading enthusiast, shared with me the Excel spreadsheet her newly minted high school graduate niece keeps as a personal book record. Organized from about kindergarten through the present, this spreadsheet is an effective and evocative album closely akin to a well organized collection of snapshots and class pictures of this 18-year-old's reading experiences--or places she's gone and documented and remembered across her book life to date.

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Learning and Teaching by Pattern Recognition

There is no longer any credible argument that a range of tech skills aren't  important to 21st century literacy. Yet one worry/concern/unhappiness I often hear from public library staff is frustration with trying to teach folks how to navigate various databases and distinguish the user's perceptions of databases from the World Wide Web. Maybe reviewing what we know about our own--and users' --abilities to recognize patterns can lower that threshold of angst. Pattern recognition is something we do all the time:

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How Do Off Duty Discussions Influence Your Library Practice?

Over the weekend, I spent a couple hours in discussion with three lawyers, one practicing, one retired from an academic career, and a third disillusioned and in the throes of considering other vocational options. At some point, the talk turned to classification--within library systems of materials and, in hyper-contrast (?), by the Nazis of populations--and the question was floated: are you a lumper or a splitter?

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Learning and Teaching by Pattern Recognition

There is no longer any credible argument that a range of tech skills aren't  important to 21st century literacy. Yet one worry/concern/unhappiness I often hear from public library staff is frustration with trying to teach folks how to navigate various databases and distinguish the user's perceptions of databases from the World Wide Web. Maybe reviewing what we know about our own--and users' --abilities to recognize patterns can lower that threshold of angst.

Pattern recognition is something we do all the time:

[more]

Questioning Paradigms

Yesterday Forbes published the first of a proposed two-part examination of the Big-6 book publisher/library contretemps around digital book files as collection offerings.

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"Lies, Damn Lies and Statistics"

Yesterday marked the opening of a new session of Infopeople's CORE Reference Fundamentals online course, which I've been teaching twice a year since Carole Leita retired in 2006. One of the six modules in which participants learn, practice and refine their basic reference skills focuses, of course, on resource evaluation.

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Long Tail Questions about Nonresident Fees

This past week, prompted by continuing research efforts to find ways to respond to budget belt tightening, this series of questions directed to public libraries already charging nonresident fees appeared on CALIX:

1.       How much do you charge?

2.       Is it a one time or annual fee?

3.       When and why did you implement the fee?

4.       How many nonresident patrons did you have before the fee was implemented?  How many do you have now?

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